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Friday, January 20, 2017

Friday Book Recomendation

The Encyclopedia Of Country Living


The bestselling resource for modern homesteading, growing and preserving foods, and raising chickens, The Encyclopedia of Country Living includes how to cultivate a garden, buy land, bake bread, raise farm animals, make sausage, can peaches, milk a goat, grow herbs, churn butter, build a chicken coop, catch a pig, cook on a wood stove, and much, much more. This comprehensive resource is the most authoritative guide available to a sustainable lifestyle and living off of the land.

Carla Emery started writing The Encyclopedia of Country Living in 1969 during the back-to-the-land movement of that time. She continued to add content and refine the information over the years, and the book went from a self-published mimeographed document to a book of 928 pages.

This 40th Anniversary Edition reflects the most up-to-date resource information and the most personal version of the book that became Carla Emery's life work. It is the original manual of basic country skills that have proved essential and necessary for people living in the country, the city, and everywhere in between.

Carla Emery's The Encyclopedia of Country Living contains 1,000,000 words, 2,000+ recipes, and 1,500+ mail-order sources (for everything she tells you how to do, she also tells you where to get the supplies to do it). This book is so basic, so thorough, so reliable, that it deserves a place in every home.



Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Making A Winter Survival Kit - Guest Post by Lee Flynn



Packing A Personal Winter Survival Kit
This winter's weather should remind each of us that winter survival kits aren't just a luxury item; they can be literal lifesavers. While everyone should have a winter survival kit in their car, those of us who don't drive should carry a personal kit as well. Whether we're walking to the corner store or taking a bus across-town, it's best to be prepared for an emergency.

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Rabbit Hunting - Guest Post by Brandon Cox



Rabbit Hunting Slingshot – Everything You Need to Know

Get your slingshot ready and hit the fields searching for rabbit. It’s possible to hunt rabbits with a slingshot and it’s a great activity to do between seasons. The best part is you don’t have to carry your rifle, scope, and other hunting gear with you. Instead, you just grab some pellets and put your slingshot in your pocket and hit your hunting area. To make it even easier, here’s everything you need to know about rabbit hunting with a slingshot.

 Where to Hit a Rabbit with a Pellet 

One of the most important things to understand when hunting rabbits with a slingshot is that you must make a good hit, or your actions could be deemed unethical. Hitting a rabbit with a pellet but not killing it could cause a rabbit pain and leave you empty handed for dinner. Below, we’ll go over where you should aim when hunting rabbits. 
Rabbit Skull 
The ideal place to hit a rabbit with a slingshot is the skull. This hit is almost always an immediate death. It doesn’t matter what type of pellet you use in the slingshot. However, rabbit’s heads are very tiny, which makes it a difficult target to hit. 
Atlas
What’s the atlas? The atlas of a rabbit is located right where the skull connects to the cervical vertebrae. Aiming at this area will cause an instant death because it disconnects the nervous system from the brain. It’s a tough shot and requires you to use a heavy projectile in the slingshot, but it’s a great way to kill any bunny rabbit. 
Cervical Vertebrae 
A cervical vertebrae shot requires you to shoot the slingshot right at the neck bone. If you hit the area just right, it will cause the rabbit’s body to shut down or total paralysis. Again, you might need a heavier projectile for this shot to create the results you are looking for. 
Don’t Shoot Blindly at Rabbits 
Now that we’ve covered where you should aim, it’s important to tell you why. There are plenty of people out there that recommend just aiming at the body. With this method, a shot anywhere will probably cause an eventual death, but it doesn’t mean you’ll be able to score the rabbit. 
When a rabbit is hit by a pellet from a slingshot, the shooter probably did enough damage to take the rabbit out, but not enough to kill it instantly. What this means is the rabbit will take off running. If you can’t find it, it will die a painful and slow death. For that reason, it’s important to take a good shot every time you aim your slingshot. 

 Where to Hunt for Rabbits 

Rabbits are small and fast. They are great hiders and are easy to find anywhere there is a constant food and water source. Some of the most popular hiding places for rabbits are industrial sites, deserts, and even your own backyard.
At an industrial site, rabbits will hide anywhere there is something to hide in. Abandoned houses or buildings close to food and water sources are also great hiding sources. During cold winter months rabbits will hide under buildings or debris left in the work yard.  
In a desert location, rabbits are found hiding near bushes and brambles. Even tall grass will do. But, if you’re looking for rabbits in the desert, you’ll have to know how to track the cottontails down. To do this, look at the roads surrounded by the desert. If you start near the road and travel into the desert, you’ll know exactly where they live because you’ll see their tracks. 
Backyards are a great place to find bunnies because you probably know exactly where they are. You’ve probably seen them scurrying around while you mow the line or just walking through the yard. If this is the case, you know where the rabbits are hiding. All you must do is sit and wait and you’ll be ready to pounce on a bunny with your slingshots and projectile. 
Now you have everything you need to know about shooting rabbits with a slingshot and projectile. The most important thing is to be ethical when you’re looking hunting rabbits. Don’t just aim wildly at the rabbits. Instead, consider the information provided above and make sure you always take a good shot. You also need to make sure you recover a rabbit every time you take a shot. It’s important to never leave a rabbit to suffer outdoors. Instead, recover a rabbit after ever shot. 
About Author:
Brandon Cox is the founder of StayHunting, who is passionate about all things of hunting and fitness. Through his hunting website, he would like to share tips & tricks, finest tech that will excite all of the intricacies of hunting whether you be an amateur or a professional.