Pages

EP Week

Friday, May 12, 2017

Friday Book Recomendation


The 7 Steps to Emergency Preparedness for Families: A Practical and Easy-To-Follow Guide to Prepare for Any Disaster


In this ground-breaking new book, nationally respected disaster specialist Kim Fournier simplifies emergency preparation. With over 30 years' experience, Fournier has developed a must-have tool for those who want to prepare and protect their family and home from any type of disaster, and gain the peace of mind that comes with being truly prepared.
This book is a practical, easy-to-follow, and comprehensive action guide that combines the latest research, science-based evidence, and practical lessons learned from past disasters, as well as over 30 years' of experience in disaster management, public health, and survival techniques. Once you have completed the 7 Steps, you'll be ready for any disaster!
You will learn these important skills and more:
  • Communicate and reunite with your family after a disaster.
  • Safely shelter in your home and evacuate.
  • Assemble essential items for your family's needs.
  • Prepare your family home for any type of disaster.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

17 Facts About Emergency Preparedness

 

  1. Roughly 5,000 earthquakes are recorded in Canada every year.
  2. Canada gets more tornadoes than any other country except the U.S., averaging about 50 tornadoes per year.
  3. The worldwide cost of natural disasters has skyrocketed from $2 billion in the 1980s, to $27 billion over the past decade.
  4. Canada’s first billion dollar disaster, the Saguenay flood of 1996, triggered a surge of water, rocks, trees and mud that forced 12,000 residents to evacuate their homes.
  5. Some hailstones are the size of peas while others can be as big as baseballs.
  6. Approximately 85% of Canadians agree that having an emergency kit is important in ensuring their and their family’s safety, yet only 40% have prepared or bought an emergency kit. Complete yours online at www.GetPrepared.ca.
  7. In 2011, flooding in Manitoba and Saskatchewan featured the highest water levels and flows in modern history. Over 11,000 residents were displaced from their homes.
  8. Ice, branches or power lines can continue to break and fall for several hours after the end of an ice storm.
  9. The deadliest heat wave in Canadian history produced temperatures exceeding 44ºC in Manitoba and Ontario in 1936. Rail lines and bridge girders twisted, sidewalks buckled, crops wilted and fruit baked on trees.
  10. In 2007, the Prairies experienced 410 severe weather events including tornadoes, heavy rain, wind and hail, nearly double the yearly average of 221 events.
  11. The coldest temperature reached in North America was –63ºC, recorded in 1947 in Snag, Yukon.
  12. The largest landslide in Canada involved 185 million m3 of material and created a 40m deep scar that covered the size of 80 city blocks in 1894 at Saint-Alban, Quebec.
  13. Hurricanes are bigger and cause more widespread damage than tornadoes (a very large system can be up to 1,000 kilometres wide).
  14. One of the most destructive and disruptive storms in Canadian history was the 1998 ice storm in Eastern Canada causing hardship for 4 million people and costing $3 billion. Power outages lasted for up to 4 weeks.
  15. The June 23, 2010 earthquake in Val-des-Bois, Quebec produced the strongest shaking ever experienced in Ottawa and was felt as far away as Kentucky in the United States.
  16. Using non-voice communication technology like text messaging, email, or social media instead of telephones takes up less bandwidth and helps reduce network congestion after an emergency.
  17. At the end of October 2012, Hurricane Sandy devastated parts of the Caribbean and the northeast of the North American continent. When the hurricane made landfall in the United States it blended with a continental cold front forming a storm described as the "Monsterstorm" by the media.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Emergency Management in Canada: How Does It Work?



In a country that borders on three oceans and spans six time zones, creating an emergency response system that works for every region is a huge challenge. That's why emergency management in Canada is a shared responsibility. That means everyone has an important role to play, including individuals, communities, governments, the private sector and volunteer organizations.
Basic emergency preparedness starts with each individual. If someone cannot cope, emergency first responders such as police, fire and ambulance services will provide help.
If the municipality needs additional assistance or resources, they can call on provincial/territorial emergency management organizations, who can seek assistance from the federal government if the emergency escalates beyond their capabilities. Depending on the situation, federal assistance could include policing, national defence and border security, and environmental and health protection.
Requests for assistance from provincial/territorial authorities are managed through Public Safety Canada, which maintains close operational links with the provinces and territories. It can take just a few minutes for the response to move from the local to the national level, ensuring that the right resources and expertise are identified and triggered.
Everyone responsible for Canada's emergency management system shares the common goal of preventing or managing disasters. Public Safety Canada is responsible for coordinating emergency response efforts on behalf of the federal government. More information is available on the Public Safety web site at www.publicsafety.gc.ca (click on “Emergency Management”).