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Saturday, November 3, 2012

One Year Food Storage Organization System



For some interesting facts about canned SPAM click here.
One of the things I struggled with in the area of food storage was keeping track of everything and making sure I was storing enough.  That gets complicated when you are wanting to store enough food for ONE WHOLE YEAR for a large group of people. 

I've talked lots about WHY I am crazy enough to even want to attempt this so I'll just carry on from there.

 I've tried several food storage calculators and messed around with my own versions but was never satisfied until recently.  I was looking for a simple way to keep track so I came up with a system that's easy to read and see at a glance.  It can be used for any length of food storage and include any of your favourite foods. It can also be expanded to include non-food items that you want to store but for simplicity sake I keep that information separately.
I used various sources for my calculations.  I started with the basics come from the most recent LDS manual that you can download for free here.  I expanded my lists by considering foods that store well and that we eat regularly.  I also made allowances for food sensitivities in our family - less white rice and no white flour for us and more variety in whole grains and gluten free grains.  These lists have come out of a few years of practice and note-taking as to what we eat regularly.  I have also made a concerted effort to include some of the items we do not eat regularly but store really well and make them a part of our monthly menus.  We still have a long way to go but all of this is a process!

Most sources say 400lbs of grain per year per person is a minimal goal.  The first question you may ask is - how many buckets is that??  Here's a handy chart from www.foodstoragemadeeasy.net


Food Item
#10 Can
5 Gallon Bucket
Wheat
5 pounds
37 pounds
White Flour
4.5 pounds
33 pounds
Cornmeal
4.3 pounds
33 pounds
Popcorn
5 pounds
37 pounds
Rolled Oats
2.5 pounds
20 pounds
White Rice
5.3 pounds
36 pounds
Spaghetti
N/A
30 pounds
Macaroni
3.1 pounds
21 pounds
Dried Beans
5.6 pounds
35 pounds
Lima Beans
5.4 pounds
35 pounds
Soy Beans
5 pounds
33 pounds
Split Peas
5 pounds
33 pounds
Lentils
5.5 pounds
35 pounds
White Sugar
5.7 pounds
35 pounds
Brown Sugar
4.42 pounds
33 pounds
Powdered Milk
3 pounds
29 pounds
Powdered Eggs
2.6 pounds
20 pounds


If anything I erred on the side of abundance with the suggested amounts from these sources.  I've copied an sample below to show you how it works.  I used an average of 33lb or 15kg per bucket for the grains which means I need about 12 pails in total to make up the 400lbs per person recommended.  Then I listed the grains I wanted to store and decided how I was going to divide up the storage.  As you can see below I am actually aiming for 15.5 - 5 gallon buckets per person per year.  I like variety.

I've done the same with all the categories - Grains, Beans/Meat, Cooking oils, Salt, Milk/Dairy, Fruit, Vegetables and Other Necessities.

Since this is MY list is really will only serve as a jumping off point for others.  Our family doesn't need to store eggs - we have chickens.  We eat much of our vegetables in the summer from the garden and hope to improve our productivity over the next few years so I have only included the vegetables that we actually store long term by canning, freezing or root cellaring.  I also don't store a lot of store bought dehydrated or freeze dried foods - just my personal choice.

The chart below is fairly self- explanatory.  There's room on this chart for 5 people but it can of course be expanded.  The "X's" represent the number of pails I have already stored.  I use the highlighter function to remind me that I have bought the product but still need to properly package it for long term storage.  So in the example below I have 2 pails of large flake oatmeal in storage and enough for one more pail that will be packed in a pail with mylar and an O2 absorber as soon as I have a few more buckets to do at one time.

Farther down the list I have some canned goods and instead of using "X's" I just write the number in the space provided.  eg. for tomato sauce I write "20" or if I am working up to that 12 or 15 or whatever I have so I will be able to add my new purchases and carry on to the next "person" (per) on the chart.

I debated whether or not to include the details of WHAT I store because I believe that everyone's food storage needs to be personalized to their own needs.  HOWEVER we all need to start with something and I like seeing charts like this myself so I am sharing it anyway!

The amounts listed for each item are based on how much of them we already eat.  It's sometimes hard to imagine how much food it takes for a whole year simply because we are disconnected to it by not having to prepare much of it ourselves.  Imagine having to bake every loaf of bread, grind wheat to make every muffin and cookie you eat - that's a lot of food!


Here's a link to a food storage calculator.  It will allow you to input your families ages and be given a basic list - consider the one below Anita's expanded list!

GRAINS 400 lb min
12pails
1 per
2 per
3 per
4 per
5per
Wheat kernels soft
2
XX
XX



Wheat kernels hard
3
XXX
X



Steel cut oats
1
X
X



Large flake oatmeal
1
X
X
X


Brown rice
1
X
X



Pasta
2
XX
XX



Parboiled rice
2
XX




Millet
.5
X
X



Quinoa
.5





Spelt
1
X
X



Buckwheat
.5





Quick Oatmeal
1



















BEANS/MEAT 60lb min
5 pails
1 per
2 per
3 per
4 per
5per
Dried beans kidney
1




Dried beans chickpea
1





Lentils/red or brown
1




Yellow/green peas/split peas
1




Dried beans black
1





Canned chicken/turkey
50





Canned salmon
50





Canned sardines
20





Home canned meat
25





Falafel mix
5



















COOKING OIL 10quarts
20lb
1 per
2 per
3per
4 per
5 per
Butter Powder
1




Olive oil
2




Coconut oil
4




Mayo
2




Peanut butter
2




Vegetable oil
3-5L




Nutella
2



















SALT 8lb min
8
1 per
2 per
3 per
4 per
5 per
Pounds of salt
8



















 MILK/DAIRY 75lb min
75lb
1 per
2 per
3 per
4 per
5 per
Milk powder
40lb




Canned evaporated milk
12




Almond milk
24




Powdered cheese
2





Coconut milk
10







FRUIT 170 quarts

1 per
2 per
3 per
4 per
5 per
Applesauce
25 quarts




Dried apricots
10 pkg.





Coconut
.25 pail





Mandarin oranges
20 cans





Pears
20 quart





Peaches
20 quart





Pineapple
25 cans





Raisins
1lb





Dates
4 pkg.





Figs
10 pkg.





Jam
20 pint



Apple butter
2 pint











VEGETABLES 200 quarts
200 qu
1 per
2 per
3 per
4 per
5 per
Beans
50




Beets/plain/pickled
25  pints




Carrots
10




Onions
10lb




Peppers frozen
2 bags




Pickles
10




Canned Potatoes
10 quarts




Rhubarb
5 froz




Sauerkraut
5 quarts





Spinach/kale
10 froz





Tomato sauce
50
50



Home canned soups
20




Diced tomatoes
20





Salsa
2




Boxed potatoes
1




Canned corn
5





Sweet potatoes
10 quarts





Chili sauce
1




BBQ sauce
1




Sprouting Seeds
1 quart







OTHER NECESSITIES

1 per
2 per
3 per
4 per
5 per
Baking powder
2





Baking soda
10




Sugar
1 pail




Brown sugar
.5 pail




Apple juice
12 cans




Hot chocolate mix
2 can




Instant yeast
2 brick




Garlic powder
1 quart





Cinnamon
1 quart





Carob chips
.25 pail




Cocoa powder
1 can





Ginger
1 quart





Ketchup
2 bottle




Mustard
2 bottle




Relish
1 bottle




Lemon juice
1 bottle





Black pepper
1 quart





Maple syrup
4L




Honey
5lb





Stevia
2 bottles





Crackers
5 box





Cold cereal
5 box





Walnuts
2lb





Almonds
2lb





Hemp seeds
2lb





Flax seeds
5lb




Dehy.Veggie flakes
1 pail





Vinegar
10 bottle




Apple cider vinegar
2 bottle





Mrs. Dash
1 jar





Pickling spice
.5 quart




Herbal tea
5 boxes




Caf-lib
1 jar





Tea bags
50




Coffee
 1




Parmesan cheese
2 can





Bouillon
12 cubes













I've expanded this list over the years.  I started with the most basic things and added more items as I thought of them.  Some of these things I could do without but they are nice to have. Some items like hot sauce I currently have in the fridge but we are not huge hot-sauce-kind-of-people so I don't actually have it on the list - I think the last bottle of hot sauce lasted two years.

There are other items I could have added and may add in the future but for now this is what I am working on.


I watch for sales to add to my stores.  For example this week pasta was on sale so I purchased enough to fill several buckets.  It was on sale for .77 for 900gr.  900 gr. is approx 2 pounds. It takes 21lbs of macaroni to fill a bucket so that's 11 packages. 11 x .77c = $8.47 per bucket. O2 absorbors and mylar liner take the cost up to approx. $10.00 in total if you can get a free bucket. Not a bad deal.


I am also careful to keep things balanced - no sense having pasta for 10 people for a year and no sauce.


One of the eureka moments I've had over the past years with food storage and organization is to divide it into five different components.  

  1. Long term storage - it's packed in Mylar and rotated out in 15-30 years.
  2. Long term shelf stable food - our personal grocery store - wet pack foods, boxed foods we rotate within 5 years.
  3. Freezer items - we rotate out in 1 year and replenish
  4. Upstairs pantry - our every day eating - not counted in food storage and probably enough for several weeks
  5. Fridge items - on a weekly/bi-weekly rotation

I keep track of long term storage but I don't count everything in fridge and freezer - I just consider it extra food.  By eating primarily from the fridge, freezer and cold cellar we continue to rotate the most perishable foods first without having to add and subtract from the food storage lists.  We store vegetables and fruit for 6 months over the winter in our basement which we eventually hope to extend further with a proper root cellar.  Then we eat fresh from the garden as much as possible in the warmer months.  Season extenders such as cold frames and a greenhouse  are on the list for the future.

If you are feeling discouraged at the length of the list and the planning involved - know this:  you have to start somewhere. "What is not started will never get finished." —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 

Start with a three day supply of shelf stable food.  Expand it to a week, then three weeks, then three months.  Remember to store foods you like to eat.  Who cares if SPAM is on sale if no one likes it! YUCK!  


There are lots of plans out there and ANY plan is better than NO plan.  Keep working towards your food storage goals - step by step.  Whether it's for three months or one year I hope seeing my One Year Food Storage Organizational System will help you to make sense of your own.

2 comments:

paul said...

I am overwhelmed at the amout of time consumtion this will take ..and for me i have no fire arms at the moment so i don't want to prep and have some one slit my throat and walk away with it i want to be able to fight to defend it all ..at least . also i am really looking to join a group that meet's regularly...to discuss bug out plans and safe locations to meet.

Charles Brawnyson said...
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