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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Guest Post from Dan F.Sullivan at SurvivalSullivan



Here’s How to Prevent Hypothermia

In the classic scenario of bugging out through the woods, most people think that food and water are more important than shelter. This couldn’t be further from the truth. According to the rule of threes, you can survive 3 hours without shelter, 3 days without water and 3 weeks without food.
Counter intuitive, right? You can have all the food and water in the world but when night sets in and you’re all alone outside, with no place to go, lack of shelter will quickly cause your core body temperature to drop, taking you into a state of hypothermia. This doesn’t mean you’re dead in 3 hours if you don’t have shelter but it can mean you won’t have the ability to think properly.

Monday, August 24, 2015

Movie Monday - Texas Ranch House Episode 7

This Week On Movie Monday

Texas Ranch House

Episode 7

I chose this series for it's many similarities to situations relevant to preppers.  It incorporates some issues regarding homesteading as well as hosting a MAG on your property.  The goal is to place a group of people on a defunct ranch and have them live as they would in post civil war Texas to make the ranch a success.

We see a few issues regarding successful management, efficient use of resources, division of assets such as food from the garden, and getting along with employees.







 These films are presented as an exception to the copyright act as fair dealing for the purpose of research, private study, education, parody or satire. See bill c-42 article 29.

Friday, August 21, 2015

Magnetic CPN Logo Signs Available!

Hey folks,
If you are organizing a meet for CPN members, and would like something to mark the spot, I have magnetic signs available.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Learn the Real Truth About Food Storage So that Your Family is Prepared - Guest Post by Lee Flynn




It could be because of a blizzard that blocks roads until the weather clears, and the snow can be plowed away. It could be due to a heavy rainstorm that leaves a neighborhood without electricity for several days. It could happen because of unemployment or receiving less money during a pay period than expected. 

Often people believe that government agencies or non-profit organizations will help in times of crisis; unfortunately, it can take days to get help to those who need it in an emergency. Common misconceptions like this have left many unprepared. Every household must have http://www.foodstorage.com/must-have-emergency-food-storage”>emergency food
because one can never know when hardship may fall on an individual or family. Common myths about food storage increase the risks of a family not being prepared. Learning the truth about the nutritional value, taste, cost and use of a food storage supply can help people to be prepared.Learn the truth about food storage myths and be prepared in case of emergency. 


"Dehydrated food has little nutritional value, so there is no point in storing it."


While some of the nutrients are lost during the dehydrating process, many of the http://www.livestrong.com/article/340760-nutritional-value-of-dehydrated-vegetables/“>nutrients and calories in dehydrated foods
become concentrated, making dried foods a nutritional and healthy choice for food storage. This is due to the amount of water that fresh food contains. When food is dehydrated, it loses this water content, concentrating the calories and nutrients. 

For example, a fresh plum that weighs two ounces contains 35 calories, 0.1 milligrams of iron and 670 international units (IU) of vitamin A. In comparison, two ounces of dehydrated plums provide 193 calories, 2 milligrams of iron and 952 IU of vitamin A. More calories and nutrition are provided in the dehydrated food versus fresh, ounce per ounce. 
Likewise, a fresh banana is composed of approximately 75 percent water. Removing this water during dehydration condenses the nutrients and calories. When fresh and dehydrated bananas are compared ounce per ounce, dehydrated bananas provide four times the amount of fiber, potassium, carbohydrates, sugar and calories; additionally, dried bananas are slightly higher in vitamin B-6 than fresh bananas. 


“Food storage is too expensive."


When beginning a food storage supply, the cost can seem overwhelming. Food storage does not need to be purchased all at once. Buying extra cans of food, bags of grain or a few packs of dehydrated food each week will help to slowly build up a good supply of food, without harming the budget. 

Additionally, many people forget when pricing food that the water has already been removed from fruits and vegetables that are dehydrated. For example, a fresh onion is approximately 89 percent water. After the water is removed during dehydration, a can of dehydrated onions contains more onion than their fresh counterparts once re-hydrated. This can equate in dehydrated food being just as cost-efficient as fresh. 


“Foods with a longer shelf-life don't taste good."


Many years ago, food storage only consisted of bulk grain items such as wheat, beans, oats and rice. Faced with the thought of having to live off of rice and wheat, many people believed that there was no point in storing food that their family wouldn't eat because of the taste. 

Modern day technology has improved the taste of shelf-stable food considerably. Fresh-fruits and vegetables can be dehydrated or freeze-dried, as well as milk, butter, yogurt, cheese and meat. Having these items as part of food storage, along with whole grains, can liven up meals and provide needed nutrients and calories. 


“Dehydrated foods don't last long enough for me to actually use them in an emergency."


With the modern commercialized processing of dehydrated foods, many foods can have a shelf live that varies from one to 25 years. Dehydrated foods can be used as a part of daily cooking in soups, casseroles and as snacks. Keeping these foods organized by date of expiration can help families to use them before they expire. 
Whatever the case may be, having an emergency supply of food can help families during natural disasters, man-made disasters or times of economic hardship. 

Monday, August 17, 2015

Movie Monday - Texas Ranch House Episode 6

This Week On Movie Monday

Texas Ranch House

Episode 6

I chose this series for it's many similarities to situations relevant to preppers.  It incorporates some issues regarding homesteading as well as hosting a MAG on your property.  The goal is to place a group of people on a defunct ranch and have them live as they would in post civil war Texas to make the ranch a success.

We see a few issues regarding successful management, efficient use of resources, division of assets such as food from the garden, and getting along with employees.





PS...sorry for not posting last Monday.


 These films are presented as an exception to the copyright act as fair dealing for the purpose of research, private study, education, parody or satire. See bill c-42 article 29.

Friday, August 14, 2015

The Provincial Blogs Return

WRITERS WANTED

As announced at the Survival Expo, the CPN will soon be reopening the provincial blogs.

In order for this to be a success, we need you!

We are looking for moderators and blog authors 

from every province and territory

to moderate and author these resources.

If this interests you, please apply here.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

The Survival Expo Summary


Well, months of planning and anticipation manifested into 2 short days in Niagara Falls.  Honestly, the days felt pretty long for most of the exhibitors, myself included, but all in all I would consider it a success.  Sure, there have been some comments out there about there not being enough exhibitors, but let's face it, this was the very first event of this kind in Canada, and rumor has it, not the last!

Before I go any further, there are a few people I need to thank publicly.

  • Oldschool and HopeImReady from the forum who helped run the booth while I met other exhibitors, got to attend a seminar or two, or just plain needed to run to the bathroom.
  • Martin and Darko from the Survival Expo for working closely with me throughout the whole process and made sure I had everything I needed.
  • Wolf from Barefoot Bushcraft for providing a relaxing place to stay during the trip.
  • Che Bhodi from the Ontario Preppers Survival Network for introducing me to some awesome contacts in the area. 
  • All those who donated camping gear for the Norther Ontario Boy Scouts...thanks to all of you for your generosity!

Without the support of all of those mentioned above, The CPN would not have had the opportunity to exhibit.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

VISIT THE CPN AT THE SURVIVAL EXPO

COME SEE US AT

THE SURVIVAL EXPO

AUGUST 8/9 

SCOTIABANK CONFERENCE CENTER

NIAGARA FALLS, ONTARIO

BOOTH 29


Monday, August 3, 2015

Movie Monday - Texas Ranch House Episode 5

This Week On Movie Monday

Texas Ranch House

Episode 5

I chose this series for it's many similarities to situations relevant to preppers.  It incorporates some issues regarding homesteading as well as hosting a MAG on your property.  The goal is to place a group of people on a defunct ranch and have them live as they would in post civil war Texas to make the ranch a success.

We see a few issues regarding successful management, efficient use of resources, division of assets such as food from the garden, and getting along with employees.









 These films are presented as an exception to the copyright act as fair dealing for the purpose of research, private study, education, parody or satire. See bill c-42 article 29.