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Wednesday, June 6, 2018

How to Prepare for Emergencies in Canada: A Helpful Guide - Guest Post By Mitchell Wood


Whenever people travel to Canada, the first thing they comment on is the frigid weather before anything else (yes, even before elk and deer hunting!). They ask me, "How do you survive the cold?" while I, in turn, wonder how they live in the extremely hot climates!

Well, during winter in Canada isn't equal across the entire nation. There are specific areas that have much more extreme conditions compared to others. With that being said, there are unfortunately more risks of disasters. Across Canada, there are a ton of safety hazards like floods, earthquakes, blizzards, or even tornadoes! In addition to that, there are also other risks like accidents or power outages because of it.

That's why it's crucial to know how you can survive these harsh weather conditions and the consequences that come with it. If you're wondering how, then read on as we talk preparing for emergencies across Canada.
The Ultimate Guide to Emergency Preparation
While we can never be entirely prepared for what may come, it's best to at least plan ahead and pack what's needed to stay as safe as possible. Here are the four major points to start your plans off with:
1. Acquaint Yourselves With the Risks
Before you learn about preparing for the worst, you have to know the risks associated with where you are from. Like mentioned, winter and harsh weather conditions in Canada aren't always the same across regions.

For example, in northern regions, you have the extreme cold weathers with more risks of natural disasters. In regions such as Muskoka and Bruce, it isn't as intense.

There are more risks of earthquakes in British Columbia, tornadoes in Ontario, and blizzards in Nunavut. Many provinces are susceptible to flash floods.

Some of these national disasters might be relevant in your area. You will be able to acquaint yourself with what you need to prepare for through websites such as GetPrepared.ca, where you can identify the most likely disasters.
2. Create a Plan
Once you have now identified with what you need to prepare for, it's time to create an emergency plan. This will help you and your loved ones know what to do in case of anything unexpected that arises.

In case an emergency happens, you might not be together with your whole family. It's best to plan on where and how you will meet, as well as how to contact each other and what to do during various situations.

Practice any evacuation plans made, draw emergency exits at home, and identify safe and evacuation areas all of you can visit.

Update your emergency plans yearly and make sure that you practice evacuating your home, as well as changing batteries of your smoke alarm, restocking kits, or replacing food and water in your emergency kits.
3. Prepare an Emergency Kit
During emergencies, you won't be able to pop by the stores and get what's needed. Furthermore, you might experience power and water outages for a few days to weeks, depending on the intensity of the disaster.

The kit should be easy to carry with everyone knowing where it is. Keep it in a suitcase with wheels or in a backpack, stored in an accessible area. Here's a checklist on what to pack:

• At least two liters of water
• Food that doesn't spoil
• Manual can opener
• Flashlight, candles, matches, and lighters
• Radio
• Basic first aid kit and any special medicine needed
• Extra keys to house and car
• Cash in small bills and coins
• Copy of contact information and emergency plan, as well as copies of documents and identification
Toiletries
• Garbage bags
• Basic tools
• Extra clothes and footwear (cold weather boots and thick jackets are recommended for the freezing weather)
4. Learn Who to Contact
Once you already prepared everything, from a plan to emergency kits for the family, it's best to acquaint yourself with who to contact. There are many resources and emergency contacts across Canada, all depending on the region you're from. Do your research and collect contact information for hospitals, local government offices, and schools with evacuation centers.

Besides learning who to contact, make sure that you mentally prepare yourselves for what may happen. Learn all about the risks and impact of such disasters, showing your whole family what may happen rather than to hope for the best. It isn't just about being physically prepared but emotionally as well, as this can be traumatic.
Wrapping It Up

Canada is a beautiful and quaint place to live in. However, with its frigid weather and risk of natural disasters, it may leave you fearful for your family. Through becoming emotionally and physically prepared for the worst, you will stay safe and lessen the risk of injury.

Use these tips as a starting point to plan with your loved ones. Don't postpone and begin preparing for emergencies today.

If you have any questions or would like to share your tips and experiences on survival and preparation, then comment below. Your input will be much appreciated.

Author Bio:

Hello and welcome to my blog. I am Mitchell, founder of Musket Hunting. Here at Musket Hunting, I provide guides on how to hunt effectively, answer reader's questions, and review on the latest hunting gears. Hunting will give you the experience that nothing else in this world can provide with.



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